St. Louis Provincecsj_logo_cmyk

Then
On January 4, 1836, six Sisters of St. Joseph left their French homeland to set sail for a new country. They did so at the request of the Bishop of St. Louis, Missouri, who needed sisters to serve in his quickly-growing diocese. These courageous women adventured on a long journey, spending three difficult months at sea. They eventually arrived aboard a Mississippi  River steamboat from New Orleans to begin their work in St. Louis. The work of the sisters
flourished, expanding across the country.

Now
Today while the St. Louis sisters give thanks to God for the great variety gifts given, they focus with greater intensity on today’s needs: they help provide housing and health care for the poor in rural Alabama; they direct community centers in central Mississippi; they counsel immigrants and victims of torture & war; they provide respite and retreat times for the homeless. In these and in many other ways, the St. Louis Province serves the “dear neighbor” most in need.

St. Paul ProvinceCSJ_logo_with_words

Then
“To understand the position of our young community our first year (November 3, 1851), you must know Minnesota was an Indian camping ground, the chief settlers were Indian traders, no farms had yet been planted, no public conveyance. The Only road—or Way to Settlement below was the Mississippi River which was then frozen, and the Wolves often attacked travelers…over the ice…” S. St. Protais DeBoille

Now
Successive generations of Sisters of St. Joseph have been equally adventurous in meeting the demands of their day. Today the St. Paul Province sisters still pioneer in education, nursing and a variety of civic, spiritual and creative ministries. Prized among our St. Paul sisters is the creative educational venture—Learning in Style. Since 1994 Learning in Style has provided a rich learning experience for newcomers to the Twin Cities community. Our emphasis at Learning in Style is on building literacy and citizenship skills in a supportive, affordable and respectful environment that is open to all who want to learn. In both mission and ministry, Learning in Style functions from within the charism, tradition and expertise of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet and Consociates of the St. Paul Province. Classes are offered at no cost to students.

Albany Provincealbany_csj_logo_blue

Then
In spite of a heavy snowfall on April 15, 1858, the parishioners of St. Mary’s Oswego, New York, gave a warm, cordial welcome to four young sisters who had arrived from St. Louis, Missouri. Soon more sisters joined them and a day school was established, as well as an academy and a home for orphans. This pattern of ministry continued as sisters were invited to serve in various parishes throughout the diocese.

Now
The Albany Province sisters offer many gifts to our broken world. They are mindful of the devastation to our planet and have worked to restore the Hudson River to pristine quality. They are dedicated to educating their students and constituencies about being responsible for Earth’s well-being.. One of the prized gifts is Carondelet Music Center. Founded in 1992, the Center fosters and encourages the inherent aesthetic, social and spiritual benefits of active music-making. The professional and dedicated staff strives to nurture and encourage a life-long love of music as they build on students’ interests and capabilities. They believe that musical appreciation and musical expression are important life skills. Not only do they enrich and expand the well-being of our society, as a cultural asset, active music participation assists individual growth in multiple capacities across the lifespan.

Los Angeles Provincecsj_los_angeles_logo

Then
After 36 days of arduous travel, seven sisters arrived in Tucson, May 26, 1870, from St. Louis. Riding the newly-completed transcontinental railroad from St. Louis to San Francisco took only five days; the sea voyage by ocean steamer from San Francisco to San Diego took another five days. But the real adventure began with the wagon trip that led through the heat and dangers of the southwestern desert, finally bringing them safely to their destination, Tucson. The bishop of this newly populated area had requested sisters who would open and staff schools.

Now
Today, Sisters in the Los Angeles Province serve in education, health care and social service agencies. They are especially mindful of children whose parents are incarcerated and arrange visits between those children and their parents. One special ministry stands out: St. Joseph Center in Venice. Its mission is to provide working poor families, as well as homeless men, women and children of all ages, with the inner resources to become productive, stable and self-supporting members of the community. One of its specialized services, the Bread and Roses Café, provides the homeless with a nutritious meal in a comfortable, welcoming environment and fosters respect and trust between guests and staff. Each day, up to 150 homeless men, women and children eat at Bread and Roses. In place of standing in line, guests sit at tables replete with tablecloths and fresh flowers while volunteers act as waiters. Sisters in Los Angeles hold this ministry in sacred trust.

Peru Vice Provinceperu_logo

Then
In 1962, the Sisters of St. Joseph responded to the request of Pope John XXIII that religious communities send ten percent of their members as missionaries to Latin America. They began as nurses in a military hospital in Lima, but being drawn to the poor of Peru’s cities and mountains, the sisters established themselves in ministries basic to human survival—daily food programs, health care, sewing classes and education at all levels.

Now
Sisters of St. Joseph in Peru today live out “the option for the poor” as teachers, school administrators, catechetical ministers, social workers, and pastoral assistants.

Hawaii Vice Provincehawaii

Then
In 1938, the Sisters of St. Joseph, at the request of Bishop Alencastre of Honolulu, arrived to staff St. Theresa’s School on the Island of Oahu. Subsequently, in response to the growing need of education for the young, the sisters opened more schools and catechetical centers in the Hawaiian Islands.

Now
As the state of Hawaii continues to expand with its multi-cultural population, the sisters strive to respond creatively to the complex and unique needs of its people. At present they serve in education as administrators, teachers, and advisors, as religious education directors, and as volunteers in parish settings.