As part of the U.S. Federation of Sisters of St. Joseph, we echo their call for the United States to act to counteract climate change.

We, the U. S. Federation of the Sisters of St. Joseph join with the Leadership Conference of Women Religious ( LCWR) in expressing our deep disappointment regarding President Trump’ s promise in 2017 to withdraw from the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. We are profoundly troubled by the decision to formally request U. S. withdrawal from this critically important international agreement.

 

We, the U. S. Federation of the Sisters of St. Joseph who are compelled by the Gospel and by our heritage to be responsive to the ” dear neighbor” without distinction, are concerned for all of God’ s creation and our sisters and brothers everywhere. Catholic teaching is clear… climate change is a grave moral issue that threatens our commitment to protect human l ife and dignity, exercise a preferential option for the most vulnerable, promote the common good, and care for God’ s creation. The failure of the United States to fulfill its 2015 commitment dishonors our nation and threatens our common home. We will continue to raise our voices against climate policies that harm Earth and its people and to advocate for climate justice.

Read the statement on the Federation website

Read the statement from the LCWR

   November 8th, 2019      Posted In: Earth Spirituality, Featured Stories, General, In The News, Justice


 

On July 14-28, our congregation will hold a Congregational Chapter, which takes place every six years. This gathering will involve more than 130 Sisters, associates, and support staff from across the United States, Japan and Peru traveling to St. Louis, Missouri. During the meeting, the Chapter body will create the “Acts of Chapter,” which are calls to action for our community. One of the Acts of Chapter from our last Congregational Chapter in 2013 called us to “act with urgency to protect [Earth’s] stability and integrity and to celebrate her beauty wherever we are.”

We know that climate change is at a crisis level on our planet and that all of our travel contributes to the problem. We also know that climate change is basically climate injustice because as we take advantage of convenient ways of travel, we simultaneously contribute to the conditions of climate disruption that disproportionately affect women, children, people of color, and other vulnerable groups.

By offsetting those emissions, we are acting concretely from our 2013 Acts of Chapter which call us to consider, “How does this decision/action impact the Earth community?” It is possible for us to make a significant contribution towards making our gathering carbon-neutral and therefore less of an injustice to our dear neighbors.

The following describes the efforts and actions that the congregation will be taking to offset the carbon footprints caused by our travel.

Carbon Offsets for a More Earth-Friendly Congregational Chapter

Albany Province | by Lin Neil, CSJ 

Our Congregational Chapter in St. Louis will necessitate a lot of travel for about 100 delegates, 22 from the Albany Province. Travel, especially by plane, creates a great deal of CO2. At this time when global warming is reaching critical levels, we need to take action to mitigate our impact on our Earth.

So what do you do when travel is imperative? Carbon offsets are part of the solution. According to Wikipedia, “Carbon offsets are measured in tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e). One tonne of carbon offset represents the reduction of one tonne of carbon dioxide or its equivalent in other greenhouse gases.

There are two markets for carbon offsets. In the larger, compliance market, companies, governments, or other entities buy carbon offsets in order to comply with caps on the total amount of carbon dioxide they are allowed to emit. (These are caps agreed on in the Kyoto Protocol, for example.)

In the much smaller, voluntary market, individuals, companies, or governments purchase carbon offsets to mitigate their own greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, electricity use, and other sources. For example, an individual might purchase carbon offsets to compensate for the greenhouse gas emissions caused by personal air travel. Carbon offset vendors offer direct purchase of carbon offsets, often also offering other services such as designating a carbon offset project to support or measuring a purchaser’s carbon footprint. In 2016, about $191.3 million of carbon offsets were purchased in the voluntary market, representing about 63.4 million metric tons of CO2e reductions” (Wikipedia, “Carbon Offsets”).

It is very exciting that voluntary carbon offsets are becoming so popular! After calculating our offsets, we learned that a round trip from Albany to St. Louis creates about 1,148 pounds of carbon dioxide and that our estimated offset cost for 22 delegates at $5.73 per trip would be about $127. (https://www.terrapass.com/calculate-carbon-offsets). This is an estimate because not everyone is flying from Albany and some trips necessitate two layovers, which create more carbon dioxide.

The really good news is that our Province Leadership Team has pledged $150 and the HomeLand Committee will give $200 toward offsets. This is more than double the actual cost of offsets!

It was decided that we would make this donation to Heifer International to plant trees in Heifer-sponsored projects. This really fulfills two goals: first, our offsets to mitigate greenhouse gases and second, our food focus since the trees will aid farmers in developing countries. According to Heifer International:

This tree gift includes seedlings and saplings of trees appropriate to the region. Recipients are educated on nurturing young trees and the importance of reforestation.

A family with a small orchard is able to supplement their diet with delicious fruits and vegetables while becoming self-reliant at the same time. Passing on the seedlings enables communities to continue the cycle of sustainability. Your plant a tree gift ensures a healthy, productive future while fighting poverty and hunger.

https://www.heifer.org/gift-catalog/sustainable-farming/gift-of-trees-donation.html

We are working to fulfill our call to action of the 2013 Chapter which challenges us “to ask in every deliberation, “How does this decision/action impact the Earth community.”

Think Globally. Act Locally. Think Congregational. Act Provincial.

Los Angeles Province | by Donna Gibbs, CSJ 

Each Congregational Chapter calls us to respond to the needs of the times. Within our provinces, we then “divide the city” and respond in diverse ways. This is exactly how a group of sisters, associates, and partners from across the Congregation responded to the 2013 Call “…to ask in every deliberation, ‘How does this decision/action impact the Earth community?'”

We met through Zoom to discuss one of our primary concerns: Climate Justice. We acknowledged our role in the injustices caused by a lifestyle that is degrading Earth systems and displacing Earth’s human and other-than-human communities. It became clear that our congregation must offset the carbon impact of our Congregational Chapter. We strategized ways to act locally regarding our carbon footprint and then went to our prospective province leadership teams to request action.

Here in the Los Angeles Province, we used a reliable carbon calculator to determine the tonnes of carbon released into Earth’s atmosphere because of our travel to and from Province Chapter. We will be doing the same for our travel to the Congregational Chapter in July. We then contributed the calculated amount (in dollars) to Community Healing Gardens in Santa Monica. They give a monthly harvest to the St. Joseph Center’s Bread and Roses Café where they serve over 100 meals to those who are homeless or transitioning back into society through their program. In addition, the Healing Gardens offer an urban school garden program. Urban gardening, removes carbon from the atmosphere, reducing the climate injustice caused by our travel activity.

Albany, St. Louis and St. Paul provinces have also offset their carbon footprint in diverse ways, according to the local needs. May we continue to “think congregational and act provincial” as we celebrate our diversity in communion within the Congregation of the Great Love of God.


Take Action: Carbon Offset Credits

St. Louis Province | by Maureen Freeman, CSJ

What does CO2 have to do with our last Province Chapter?
One of the things we did at our last chapter was to count our carbon footprint in traveling back and forth to the meeting. We roughly put into the atmosphere 10 tons of CO2, which, believe it or not, was not as bad as we thought it was going to be. We did better because more people are carpooling, many people live in the St. Louis area, and we are purchasing hybrids and fuel-efficient cars.

But here’s a reality check: the average American releases between 16 and 20 metric tons of CO2 and in Peru the average household releases 1.8 metric tons of CO2.

So as you can see, we have a ways to go to be more sustainable. That is why we decided to purchase carbon offset credits.

What are carbon offset credits?
According to the Sierra Club, the term “offset” might imply that you are “neutralizing” the impact of your travel, and thus it has no impact. This is not the case. Once you have emitted carbon, it is released into the atmosphere, and you can’t “take it back.” What offsetting does is help reduce carbon emissions elsewhere.

The province has purchased carbon offsets from:

These donations do not make up for our carbon usage. It’s more of an investment in the future so that less carbon will be used in other parts of the world. It’s a way to remind each of us that how we live costs more to the environment than we realize.

Why not give Mother Earth a gift?
So why not give Mother Earth the gift of carbon offsets? Use the links above to visit the websites for the organizations from which the province chose to purchase carbon offsets. It’s simple, inexpensive, easy, and it says “I care about Earth!”

Thank you for caring for Creation today and every day!

Offsetting Carbon Use by Planting Trees

St. Paul Province | by Jennifer Tacheny and Marty Roers

St. Paul participates in the congregational action to mitigate our carbon footprint caused by travel to Congregational Chapter meetings in St. Louis. Fourteen delegates will travel by airplane and six will travel in three cars.

We will offset the carbon use by dedicating money to plant trees on our St. Paul campus woodland area. We will include a community ritual with an educational component at the time of planting.

Supporting local projects to make an impact

Peru Vice Province | by Anne Davis, CSJ

Our vice-province of Peru is going to donate $100 toward local environmental projects where we are serving as Sisters of St. Joseph. One project will take place in Las Brisas where the Sisters are working with the parish community to add a garden area at the parish church. The other project is in the Canto Chico neighborhood in Lima, where our sisters will be involving the children in a project to plant trees in the neighborhood park. The children will learn how to care for the plants and will be responsible for watering and protecting the plants.

   June 12th, 2019      Posted In: Albany, Congregation, Earth Spirituality, Featured Stories, In The News, Justice, Los Angeles, Peru, St. Louis, St. Paul


 

As part of the U.S. Federation of Sisters of St. Joseph, we oppose Trump Administration’s Affordable Clean Energy Rule. The Federation released the following statement last week.

We, the U. S. Federation of the Sisters of St. Joseph, compelled by the Gospel and by our heritage to be responsive to the “dear neighbor” without distinction, are concerned for all of God’s creation and our sisters and brothers everywhere. We stand with the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) in our deep concern about the release of the Trump Administration’s Affordable Clean Energy rule. The proposed rule would significantly weaken the Clean Power Plan (CPP) which sought to speed the closure of coal-burning plants and the conversion to clean energy in order to reduce carbon pollution, mitigate climate change, and protect the health and welfare of all people, especially the most vulnerable.

Read the full statement on the Federation website

   August 28th, 2018      Posted In: Congregation, Earth Spirituality, Featured Stories, General, In The News, Japan, Justice


Reflections from Sisters of Earth

Who are the Sisters of Earth?

Sisters of Earth was founded in 1994 by several Catholic Sisters from the U.S. and Canada, who were engaged in exploring the new cosmology and implications for this emerging worldview. Sisters of Earth is an informal network of women who share a deep concern for the ecological and spiritual crises of our times and who wish to support one another in work toward healing the human spirit and restoring Earth’s life support systems. We are teachers, gardeners, artists, writers, administrators, workshop and retreat presenters, mothers, contemplatives, and activists in North America, South America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and beyond. This network of sharing and support is open to all women whose life and work would identify them as Sisters of Earth. We hold a general meeting every two years in different parts of the USA.

Visit the Sisters of Earth Facebook page

Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet at Sisters of Earth

This July, Sisters of Earth met in Cincinnati at Mount St. Joseph University. Representing Carondelet were associates and Sisters from most of our provinces. The theme for the 2018 conference was “Sharing the Wisdom, Shaping the Dream: Creating the Future We Want.” Throughout the conference, we together explored this theme through prayer, ritual, conferences, workshops, conversations, and pop-ups. Pop-ups were five- to ten-minute presentations that gave attendees a chance to share examples from their work/ministry/lifestyle of Active Hope.

Takeaways from some of our Sisters

Those of us from Carondelet would like to share with you our own pop-ups in the context of our takeaways from the conference experience. Some of our takeaways are connected to specific conferences and moments within the Sisters of Earth 2018 Conference. Other reflections/concerns are takeaways that are located in the context of our preparation for Chapter in 2019.

Debbie Timmis, CSJ

This was my first time attending the SOE Conference. My most significant learnings, came from the “pop-ups” They were full of examples of various communities living out their relationship with the entire Earth Community. I began to see ways forward for all of us that would impact the Earth Community in a positive way. Some ideas shared were:

  • Setting a goal as a community for zero waste;
  • Considering geothermal and solar options when we build or renovate our properties;
  • Replacing light bulbs with LED bulbs;
  • Offsetting travel with carbon credits;
  • Purchasing hybrid cars.

I would be glad to have conversation about any of these topics.

Mary Lou Dolan, CSJ

The main points that struck me at SOE as relating to the idea of Earth as context were the following:

Life on Earth has been successful in adapting to change for about four billion years, why not use some of her strategies? One way to do this would be to use, in Gloria Garcia, IHM’s terms, bio-mimicry or bio-emulation, using life’s strategies. Principles involved in doing this include interdependence and valuing diversity for health of the whole.

So some questions for us as we adapt to change might include:

  • In our concerns about “oneness”, do we also value diversity?
  • Are we leaving room for emergence in our planning and in the processes we use and put into place?

“What you can plan is too small for you to live.” -David Whyte, What To Remember When Waking

Donna Gibbs, CSJ

The best part of this conference for me was the reconnecting with sisters from all over the globe who are actively trying to live in an Earth-sustainable way within unjust social and economic systems that affect Earth’s ability to renew life. It is hard to remain counter-cultural and challenging to keep aware of my own choices. Reconnecting with the Sisters of Earth is like a shot in the arm to continue responding to our Acts of Chapter question: “How will this action affect the whole Earth community?”

Lin Neil, CSJ

A very powerful experience of the SOE conference was the “hybrid” presentation of Awakening the Dreamer. The process of beginning in gratitude (Who are we?), moving to our pain (Where are we?), seeing with new eyes (How did we get here?) and going forth (Where do we go from here?) deepened my awareness and called me to active hope. I felt these questions echoing within me as a way to reflect and to live more authentically in my personal life, and also in my ministry and community circles. There is an urgency to question the long-held assumptions of church, country, and community. There is an urgency to live the challenges of “inter-being” and to truly be in communion with the Earth family. The SOE conference was a gift and a privilege!

   August 7th, 2018      Posted In: Earth Spirituality, Justice


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Pope Francis released his latest encyclical today, “Laudato Sí, on Care for our Common Home.” Like many around the world, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet have been eagerly awaiting his treatise on climate change and echo his calls to action on behalf of the earth. We encourage all to read this important document and reflect on how we might take action in response.

Read the encyclical

Read the statement from LCWR and CMSM regarding the encyclical

Our 2013 Congregational Chapter called our Congregation to action on “Communion within the Earth Community”. In response, an active committee was formed for this work, which continues to invite us to live out our commitment to the care of creation. You can read our committee’s documents for reflection on our connection to the Earth below. Another document on water will be released soon.

Communion within the Earth Community: An Invitation to Lenten Earth Practice

Communion within the Earth Community: Food

   June 18th, 2015      Posted In: Earth Spirituality, Featured Stories, Justice


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