But that does not diminish the importance of speaking out.

 

By Jenny Beatrice, St. Louis Province Communications Director

 

As a friend was telling me about her routine work woes, the conversation took a turn when she attributed the problems to the race of her employees. Shocked by her comment, I was speechless. I hoped that the look on my face spoke to my disapproval, but I knew deep down it wasn’t enough. How could I have stayed silent?

Months later, at the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet’s congregational chapter meeting, we recited a prayer that brought me back to that haunting moment: “When human dignity is not honored, may I speak out … When rights are not respected, may I speak out … When I am most afraid to speak out, may I speak out nonetheless.”

At that same meeting, the sisters called us to “bold conversation and prophetic action” to work toward dismantling systems of oppression. And I realized my silence was more than just a slip-up — it was part of perpetuating injustice.

In her book So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo says, “There is a good chance that you, regardless of race, have tried to have these conversations in the past. There is also a good chance that they have not gone well. So ‘not well’ that perhaps you have been afraid to ever have these conversations again. If that
is you, you are not alone.”

A relative uses a racial slur at Thanksgiving dinner. A co-worker emails you an offensive joke. A neighbor makes comments about the Black family that moved on the block. Knowing these uncomfortable situations will arise, we can better participate in “bold conversations” by being ready to respond.

Be Prepared

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s guide, “Speak Up,” recommends having a response in mind before an incident happens. “Open-ended questions are often a good response: ‘Why did you say that?’ ‘How did you develop that belief?’”

Identify Behavior

Describe the behavior, and don’t label the person. You can say, “You’re classifying an entire ethnicity in a derogatory way. Is that what I hear you saying?” Avoid labeling and name-calling (from “Speak Up”).

Tie to the Bigger Picture

Oluo says, “If you hear someone at the water cooler say, ‘Black people are always late,’ you can definitely say, ‘Hey, that’s racist,’ but you can also add, ‘and it contributes to false beliefs about Black workers that keep them from even being interviewed for jobs …’”

Set Boundaries

You cannot control another person, but you can draw a line. You can say, “I don’t want you to use that language when I’m around.” Then follow through on your limits (from “Speak Up”).

Be Uncomfortable

Oluo says, “You must get used to being uncomfortable and get used to this not being about our feelings if you plan to help and not hinder people of color in the efforts for racial justice.”

Even when we say “all the right things,” we must remember that change happens slowly. Most people take small steps and don’t change their belief systems overnight. But that doesn’t diminish the importance of speaking out. Oluo says that you may not get very far at that moment, “But it gives people something to think about. These conversations, even if they feel fruitless at first, can plant a seed to greater understanding.”

So when human dignity is not honored, when rights are not respected, when we are most afraid … may we speak out.

 

For more responses to situations of everyday bigotry, access “Speak Up” at the Southern Poverty Law Center’s website splcenter.org.

 

2020 Magazine Cover

 

This article appeared in the 2020 issue of Carondelet Magazine. Find downloadable versions of this and every issue on the Carondelet Magazine page.

   May 27th, 2020      Posted In: Congregation, Featured Stories, In The News, Justice, St. Louis


The Sisters of St Joseph of Carondelet and the U.S. Federation of the Sisters of St Joseph truly celebrated Laudato Si’ Week this May 16-24! With a special focus on reducing or eliminating single-use plastics from our lives, our members were educated and inspired. We prayed together and acted as one.

The online discussion groups were energetic and insightful. After watching on our own, we had online discussions of two excellent videos on plastics (Frontline: Plastic Wars is still available for viewing). Participants had a profound appreciation for the reflective presentations offered by Sr. Linda Neil and illustrated by Sr. Marion Honors. Both “The Be-attitudes for Care of Our Common Home” and “Living Simply in a Consumer Society” are available to watch online.

Federation artists shared artwork, poems, and prayers for all to engage in reflection and use for social media.

All participants were invited to action by:

  • Expressing concern and calling for change at Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Nestlé for them to stop single-use plastic packaging.
  • Contacting their local stores and asking them to decrease carrying products packaged in single-use plastics
  • Asking their Congressional Representative to co-sponsor HR 3969, the Save Our Seas 2.0 Click here to learn more.
  • Taking one step further in their commitment to reduce their personal use of plastics, and share that commitment on social media. Click here to virtually sign the pledge.

Laudato Si’ Week was closed out with a powerful prayer celebrating the gifts and challenges of being members of this one sacred Earth community. It invited us to recommit to aligning with the Creator’s dream for our Earth.

Throughout the week participants shared their shock at how they have they have been duped by the plastic industry into thinking that recycling plastics was actually occurring when 91% of plastics produced in the last 15 years have not been recycled.

Inspiring poetry and quotes from Laudato Si’ helped participants go deeper as they pondered the calls of Laudato Si’ to care for our common home and simplify our life for the life of the world.

Inspired to make a difference, they journeyed farther in their commitment to action. Joining together they responded boldly to bring about systemic change to save our planet.

It’s not too late for those of you who were not available this week to share in these activities.  Links throughout this article will take you to resources and actions you can take. You can still find all of the details on our Laudato Si’ Week webpage.

   May 26th, 2020      Posted In: Congregation, Earth Spirituality, Featured Stories, Federation, In The News


Our congregation, in partnership with the U.S. Federation of Sisters of St. Joseph has planned a slate of events to recognize international Laudato Si’ Week and the fifth anniversary of Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical.

All are welcome to join us. Attend our interactive virtual events, post about the importance of caring for creation on social media, and take action with us! 

Find all of the details on our Laudato Si’ Week webpage

Learn more about Laudato Si’ Week 

 

   May 8th, 2020      Posted In: Congregation, Earth Spirituality, Events, Featured Stories, Federation, In The News, Justice


Congregational Leadership Team criticized Cardinal Dolan’s praise for Donald Trump

The National Catholic Reporter‘s Global Sisters Report has featured the letter our Congregational Leadership Team sent to Cardinal Dolan on May 1 in their article about various leaders of women religious sending him similar feedback. Excepts from our letter are shared along with quotes from the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) and Sister Simone Campbell of Network Lobby

“We find ourselves very discomfited by your praise of [President Trump’s] leadership,” the congregational leadership team of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet wrote in a letter dated May 1 addressed to Dolan.

Read the article

Read our full letter

   May 6th, 2020      Posted In: Congregation, Featured Stories, General, In The News, Justice


Sisters ask Cardinal Dolan to reconsider his vocal support for President Trump

Guided by the Statement of Future Direction from our most recent congregational chapter, which calls us to work toward an inclusive church and society, the Congregational Leadership Team has sent a letter to Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, asking him to reconsider his well-publicized praise and support of President Trump.

Letter to Cardinal Dolan

May 1, 2020


Timothy Cardinal Dolan
Archbishop of New York
452 Madison Ave
New York, New York, 10022

Dear Cardinal Dolan,

We write to you as the Congregational Leadership Team of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet. Aware that you shoulder great responsibility as the metropolitan of one of the largest archdioceses in the United States, we assure you that we remember you in each Eucharistic prayer when we ask God’s guidance for our Church leaders.

As your sisters in Christ, we also feel impelled to say that we are concerned about your unqualified praise of President Trump as demonstrated during your appearance on Fox News on April 26. We have read various reports and listened to your Fox interview, and we find ourselves very discomfited by your praise of his leadership.

This is not a political disagreement. We know that good and faithful people have very different political opinions, and that people in opposing camps can explain their positions on the basis of Gospel principles. But the current president of the United States is notorious for his consistent lying to the public and for poor judgment. His stances on immigration and migrants are directly opposed to what the USCCB espouses in documents like Welcoming the Stranger and recent pronouncements by Archbishop Gomez and Perez, and Bishops Tyson, Cantú, and Doronsville, among others. Instead of welcoming or even simply tolerating the “other,” our bishops themselves have said that the president sows “polarization and animosity.” Instead of offering moral leadership, he is a philanderer whose business activities like Trump University have taken advantage of the poor and vulnerable. The current president exemplifies much of what John the Baptist condemned in the ruler of his day—a prophetic task for which he lost his head but not his integrity.

The Congregational Center of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet is in your hometown, St. Louis. You may therefore be aware that we have served the People of God in the United States for 186 years. We are sure you know how we and other apostolic women religious built the educational, health, and social welfare institutions of the Catholic Church in the United States. We are faithful women of the Church. Because of that, we believe we must ask you to reexamine your public pronouncements in favor of a president whose verbal support of one or two religious causes is designed to create the impression that he supports Catholic values.

As your sisters, we ask you to reconsider your well-publicized praise and support of this president. It gives the impression that the Church itself stands with him. The scandals of the past few decades call us to a much higher standard. May God bless you with the wisdom and courage necessary to serve in these times.

Sincerely,

Congregational Leadership Team

 

CORRECTION: Cardinal Dolans remarks aired on April 27, not April 26.

   May 1st, 2020      Posted In: Congregation, Featured Stories, General, In The News, Justice


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